Event Title

The Partisan Divide: Religion, Secularism, and Geographical Segregation in the United States

Presenter Information

Morgan Carter

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Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mark Owens

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Date of Publication

1-1-2021

Abstract

The research topic I will be focusing on will be to understand how the association of the increasing secularism and religious identity of adults positively correlate to the partisan divide in the U.S. This research is significant as it would allow us to understand if those who identify with a religious ideology can determine the political environment in which they vote. Using descriptive qualitative secondary data provided by the Wheatley Institution, a non-partisan study center at Brigham Young University, to analyze adults of different ages in the United States through structured surveys. The results indicate that religion is fading consistently, with just one-third of the U.S. population being deeply religious and the other third being strictly secular. As a result, the secularization hypothesis is supported by the fact that more explicitly moderate religion is decreasing in the United States.

Keywords

religion, secularization, partisan

Persistent Identifier

http://hdl.handle.net/10950/3018

Carter Morgan; The Partisan Divide.pdf (1065 kB)
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The Partisan Divide: Religion, Secularism, and Geographical Segregation in the United States

The research topic I will be focusing on will be to understand how the association of the increasing secularism and religious identity of adults positively correlate to the partisan divide in the U.S. This research is significant as it would allow us to understand if those who identify with a religious ideology can determine the political environment in which they vote. Using descriptive qualitative secondary data provided by the Wheatley Institution, a non-partisan study center at Brigham Young University, to analyze adults of different ages in the United States through structured surveys. The results indicate that religion is fading consistently, with just one-third of the U.S. population being deeply religious and the other third being strictly secular. As a result, the secularization hypothesis is supported by the fact that more explicitly moderate religion is decreasing in the United States.