Event Title

A Warning Unheeded: Psychological Intimate Partner Violence Among College Students

Presenter Information

Rawda Tomoum
Melanie Rawls

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Faculty Mentor

Dr. Ramona I. Grad

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Date of Publication

2021

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes a major public health concern in the US; it affects 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men in their lifetime. IPV is any form of physical, sexual, psychological, or economic abuse committed against a current or former intimate partner. The focus on IPV among college students has heightened because students are at high risk of experiencing it during college years. Estimates indicate that 88% of students experience various forms of IPV. Of all types of IPV, psychological IPV (P-IPV) tends to be the most overlooked and the least reported, despite being equally severe. Forms of P-IPV include name calling, humiliation, intimidation, exploitation, social isolation, and coercion. P-IPV has been linked to poor academic performance and a myriad of long-term physical and psychological repercussions including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, alcohol use, drug use, and physical complaints. Additionally, P-IPV correlates with and can be an antecedent to physical IPV. Research has shown that P-IPV can even have more detrimental consequences on mental health than physical IPV. The purpose of this presentation is not only to shed light on the impacts of P-IPV among college students, but also on the cruciality of P-IPV screening, training, and prevention programs on college campuses. Efforts are direly needed to help detect and prevent P-IPV and to provide resources to treat and support survivors of P-IPV. Moreover, this presentation illuminates the need for future research in order to better understand P-IPV among college students with the hope that institutions of higher education will make P-IPV a priority in their educational efforts, as well as increase students’ support services (e.g., counseling).

Keywords

intimate partner violence, IPV, dating violence, psychological aggression, emotional abuse, psychological abuse, prevalence, impacts, screening.

Persistent Identifier

http://hdl.handle.net/10950/3016

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A Warning Unheeded: Psychological Intimate Partner Violence Among College Students

Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes a major public health concern in the US; it affects 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men in their lifetime. IPV is any form of physical, sexual, psychological, or economic abuse committed against a current or former intimate partner. The focus on IPV among college students has heightened because students are at high risk of experiencing it during college years. Estimates indicate that 88% of students experience various forms of IPV. Of all types of IPV, psychological IPV (P-IPV) tends to be the most overlooked and the least reported, despite being equally severe. Forms of P-IPV include name calling, humiliation, intimidation, exploitation, social isolation, and coercion. P-IPV has been linked to poor academic performance and a myriad of long-term physical and psychological repercussions including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, alcohol use, drug use, and physical complaints. Additionally, P-IPV correlates with and can be an antecedent to physical IPV. Research has shown that P-IPV can even have more detrimental consequences on mental health than physical IPV. The purpose of this presentation is not only to shed light on the impacts of P-IPV among college students, but also on the cruciality of P-IPV screening, training, and prevention programs on college campuses. Efforts are direly needed to help detect and prevent P-IPV and to provide resources to treat and support survivors of P-IPV. Moreover, this presentation illuminates the need for future research in order to better understand P-IPV among college students with the hope that institutions of higher education will make P-IPV a priority in their educational efforts, as well as increase students’ support services (e.g., counseling).